Used Camera Lenses Nottinghamshire

Local resource for used camera lenses in Nottinghamshire. Includes detailed information on local businesses that provide access to used lenses, as well as advice and content on how to inspect a used camera lens and how to appropriately price a used lens.

Currys
+44 (0) 870 609 7288
North Gate
Newark-on-Trent
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Currys.digital
+44 (0) 844 561 6263
Nottingham Road
Mansfield
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Currys.digital
+44 (0) 844 561 6263
1 Lower Parliament Street
Nottingham
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Currys
+44 (0) 844 561 6263
Mansfield Road
Nottingham
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Sony Centre
+44 (0) 1623 659632
14 Queen Street
Mansfield
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Currys
+44 (0) 844 561 6263
Nottingham Road
Mansfield
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Currys
+44 (0) 844 561 6263
Castle Bridge Road
Nottingham
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Bright House
+44 (0) 1476 568836
20-21 Isaac Newton Centre
Grantham
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Sony Centre
+44 (0) 115 947 4566
1 Mansfield Road
Nottingham
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Currys
+44 (0) 844 561 6263
London Road
Grantham
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Buying Second Hand Lenses

Good quality camera lenses are expensive. Therefore it is well worth considering saving money by buying a second hand lens. Most photographers take very good care of their equipment, so many used lenses show very little signs of wear and tear.

The main reason why there is an active second hand lens market is because photographers often like to "trade up" the lenses they currently own for better quality lenses as money permits and they become more committed to photography.

It is difficult to give a saving figure when buying second hand, but I would personally look for a minimum saving of 25%. Obviously the age and condition of any equipment needs to be taken into account when assessing whether or not an item is being sold for a fair price.

Where to Buy Second Hand

There are five main methods to buy a second hand camera lens. The first is via online stores specialising in second hand camera equipment. Next up is Ebay. You can also try visiting your local camera shop or use the classified adverts you find in the back of a typical photography magazine. Finally there are various web site message boards.

Online Stores

The big advantage of buying from a reputable online store is that you should feel a degree of confidence that you are going to get a lens as described in any advertisements. The best online stores grade their equipment so you have a good idea of the condition of the lens you are buying. Accurate grading is important for the store as their reputation can be damaged if the lens you receive bears little relation to the way it was described by the store.

In terms of price I would expect this to be one of the more expensive ways to buy a used lens, but you may consider it worth paying a little extra for a bit more security.

Buying Used Lenses on Ebay

A considerable amount of photography equipment is sold via Ebay. Although Ebay takes a commission on all sales it should still work out cheaper than buying at either online stores or your local camera shop. I would only consider buying a lens if there was a picture accompanying the advert so that you can assess the condition of the lens. Buying from someone with a good Ebay sales history can give you further peace of mind. When bidding it is always worth working out your price limit beforehand, so that you do not get caught up in a bidding frenzy and pay more than what the lens is worth.

As Ebay has matured I think it has become harder to find real bargains, but you can still find good deals there.

It is always worth following Ebay's buying guidelines. For example paying via PayPal can give you a degree of protection if you are let down by the buyer.

Buying From Your Local Camera Shop

In my opinion this is still a good way to buy second hand as you can check out the lens you are buying and see exactly what condition it is in when you buy. Historically small camera shops have always been a great place to buy. In the last few years many have closed and they a...

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Lens Sharpness

It is understandable that the sharpest pictures are normally produced by the most expensive lenses. The components used in the most expensive lenses are of the highest quality. This more than anything else contributes to pin sharp images.

Aside from the actual quality of the lens there are a few points worth considering when it comes to the sharpness of your shots.

Images Are Sharpest in the Centre

No matter how much you have paid for your lens the sharpest area of a photo is found in the centre of the shot. Even the most expensive lenses will see a fall off in sharpness as you move away towards the edges. Any loss of sharpness will be more noticeable with a cheaper lens.

Aperture Sweet Spot

If you are unimpressed with the sharpness of the shots you are taking then it is worth trying to locate the sweet spot of your lens. All lenses have a sweet spot where the images are at their sharpest. Normally this is found when you are using the middle apertures around f/8 to f/11.

Full Frame Impact

Any imperfections in the lens will be more noticeable if you use a Digital SLR with a full frame sensor. This is because the large size of the sensor will capture extra detail. If that detail is soft then that is how the image will be captured and displayed.

Camera Shake

Camera shake is the bane of a photographer's life. It doesn't matter how expensive a lens is if the camera is not held completely still while a photo is being taken. The heavier the camera and lens is the harder it is to keep everything steady. This is especially true with long telephoto lenses as these are very weighty.

Lowlight is an additional problem as the shutter needs to stay open for longer to capture enough light for the exposure. This radically increases the possibility of camera shake.

Camera Shake Image Stabilisation

This is where image stabilisation comes into play. A lens with image stabilisation built in will compensate against any minor camera shake. Some Digital SLRs have image stabilisation built into the body. If this is the case with your camera then you will not need to consider the extra expense of buying a lens with image stabilisation built in.

Camera Shake Without Image Stabilisation

If your lens does not have image stabilisation built in then the simple answer is to buy a tripod. This more than any other pieces of equipment is likely to sharpen up your images. Carrying a tripod around is not always a convenient option. If this is the case then look out for somewhere like a wall that is large enough to rest the camera on while taking your photo. Where possible trigger the shutter through either a cable release or the self timer.

Make Sure Your Lens is Clean

This may sound obvious, but careful handling of your lens is of paramount importance. If your lens is dirty then make sure it is cleaned correctly to avoid damage.

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